My Recent On-line Interview

Just wanted to offer a “thumbs up” for interested readers of my blog about my recent online interview by Wayne Potter of Keeping Kurrent on Sound Cloud.  You can listen to it by clicking on to this link.  Hope you enjoy learning more about how I came to write Under the Salvadoran Sun and my work with eco-viva.

To make it more interesting I thought I would ad some photos of my friends in El Salvador, who were so much a part of my inspiration for the story.  I am sad to read the news these days about the thousands of Central American children who are amassing at the border, trying to escape not only poverty but the horrible violence and killing of their families who are often caught in the crossfire between the narcotics traffickers and the gangs.  Children as young as four years old are recruited by the gangs to deal drugs; it’s a disparaging situation. In my view, I think we have to regard these children not as an extension of the “immigration problem” but as refugees that we must take in just as other countries in the  world have had to take in refugees.  We can not turn them back with the chance they will only face death.  Especially since the situation is largely due to the exportation of gangs from the barrios of Los Angeles, where Salvadorans were exiled during the Civil War in the 80’s. Their children were introduced to the gang culture here and when they were deported after the war they brought that culture with them; due to poverty and nowhere to go, lack of jobs and social programs they ended up the cycle of gang life and violence. I do not have the answers, but I do know the world’s eyes are upon us; as a humane nation we cannot turn these children away! PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT BELOW. I am interested in my readers’ thoughts on this. 

I have digressed. Here’s the photos.  Some of the children will steal your hearts, I think. They sure did mine. 

The chapel where Archbishop Romero was assassinated in 1980.

The chapel where Archbishop Romero was assassinated in 1980.

 

The typical Pupuseria. Puousas are the national dish, like two small tortillas with a stuffing in-between of beans, cheese, pork.

The typical Pupuseria. Puousas are the national dish, like two small tortillas with a stuffing in-between of beans, cheese, pork.

 

A small in front of the image of his hero, Archbishop Romero on the memorial wall in a park in San Salvador.

A small in front of the image of his hero, Archbishop Romero on the memorial wall in a park in San Salvador.

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Children in Ciudad Romero, El Salvador
Little Salvadoran Girl in Ciudad Romero

Little Salvadoran Girl in Ciudad Romero

 

Jose Alberto Garcia, my amigo and wonderful the wonderful art teacher I assisted.

Jose Alberto Garcia, my amigo and wonderful the wonderful art teacher I assisted.

Sher teaching art to Salvadoran childrenSher teaching art to Salvadoran children

Comments

  1. Hello,
    I am so glad to see that you have written a novel about the current gang violence in El Salvador. This is a topic that is close to my heart and that I want to research further. Do you know of any other authors, who have also written about the gang violence in Central America?

    • Sher Davidson says:

      Dear Roxana,
      My novel is not about the recent gang violence in El Salvador but more about the on-going problems due to poverty in this tiny country, much exacerbated by the poor foreign policy of the US to back the Oligarchy there, secondly to deport the children of immigrants who fled during the civil war from 1980-1992 and lived in the poor barrios of LA. It is there that the gang culture began and it is that which was exported to El Salvador with no preparation for those young people to find jobs or be educated; instead they came back to their parents’ country poor, tattooed and unable to find employment—this has led to the horrible gang violence. My novel just touches upon this and more upon the need to reform the US immigration laws which unnecessarily separate families. There is much that can be done on both sides of the borders. First and foremost it is a love story, love between two humnanitarian aid workers, love between them and a Salvadoran family. I hope you will read it and write a review on Amazon. Thank you for taking time to comment on my website.

    • Sher Davidson says:

      Dear Roxana,
      The violence in the Northern Triangle is reaching a “crisis stage” according to a recent report by Doctors Without Borders. With this in mind I have
      have formed a grassroots group to help a rescue house in Mexico near where I live half the year. The tragedies we witness everyday, both at the railroad
      tracks in our town of San Miguel de Allende as those we see at the safe house both sadden us and inspire to do more, to be that grain of sand Liam, a character in my book talks about; even what we do is a “grain of sand” it is something and makes our team feel they are helping a little. If you would like to work with us and donate to the safe house rent and utilities let me know here and I will contact you with my email address to explain the process.

      As for other Authors who have written about Gang violence in Central America, I cannot suggest any off hand, but for a good novel on the sad state of affairs for migrants, check out TC Boyle’s “Behind the Tequilla Curtain” and for a non-fiction book on immigration and the horrific ways the US is responding to the crisis, read Margaret Regan’s book “Detained and Deported.”

      Hope you have found some other authors and will share them with me. Please consider joining our efforts to help those fleeing violence in the NTCA.
      Saludos, Sher

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